Home, Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America and Caribbean, Oceania, News, Sitemap
EN


Home / Womens Secretariat / Brunei Darussalam / Articles / “Southeast Asian Women want a future with human rights and dignity”
loading map..

Facebook

(http://womenscaucusonasean.wordpress.com/)
“Southeast Asian Women want a future with human rights and dignity”

in BRUNEI DARUSSALAM, 10/04/2013

On 6-8 April 2013, Southeast Asia Women Caucus on ASEAN (Women’s Caucus) participated in the ASEAN Civil Society Conference/ASEAN People’s Forum (ACSC/APF) 2013 held in Brunei Darussalam with the theme “ASEAN: Building Our Future Together.” According to the Women’s Caucus, as ASEAN aims to achieve a regional integration by 2015, ”One ASEAN Community” is possible only when people have a meaningful say in determining their own future. Women demand an ASEAN future that is firmly based on human rights and truly transformative, democratic and sustainable.

Women’s Caucus organised a panel discussion on the situation of women domestic workers in the ASEAN region where three domestic workers also shared their stories. The panel demonstrated that access to justice has been elusive to a number of Filipina and Indonesian domestic workers in Brunei who have yet to obtain justice for discriminatory labour practices and gender-based discrimination and violence.

“A contract is just a piece of paper,”  said a returning Filipina domestic worker interviewed for the research who suffered abuse and violation of her rights.

For three years now, an Indonesian domestic worker’s demand for her unpaid wages is yet to receive justice in the Bruneian court. With no work for three years, she is unable to support her families back home.

In Asia, domestic work is the single largest form of employment for women with little to no labour rights protection because there is no legal recognition of domestic work as work in most countries in the region.

Research conducted by the Women’ s Caucus shows that women domestic workers want a future where they can enjoy their rights to decent work and living wage, communicate and access information, live with dignity, access to justice and free mobility.“
 
The economic growth model of development has only resulted in the concentration of wealth to a small minority. Migration for employment often becomes the only option for many women in Southeast Asia.

Majority of women migrant workers engage in domestic work, which is a continuation of women’s gendered role at home and in communities. They receive poverty wages (less than USD 1 per hour) while they often struggle with non-payment of their wages. There should be a measure for both policy and implementation to protect the fundamental human rights and freedoms of domestic workers,”  said Dinda Nuur Annisaa Yura from Solidaritas Perempuan, Indonesia.

Policy coherence that is centered around human rights was emphasised. “ASEAN member states especially Brunei, Indonesia and Philippine governments are called upon to recognise domestic work as work. There is still no multilateral framework at the level of ASEAN that lays the basis and the standard for member states to adhere to in the promotion and protection of the rights of domestic workers. The human rights bodies in ASEAN should strive towards protecting the rights of all migrant workers particularly domestic workers and undocumented migrants. We call on ASEAN to establish a mechanism that shall facilitate women domestic workers’ access to justice and provide redress, remedies and other support services for those whose rights have been violated,” said Chang Jordan of Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB), Philippines.

“Domestic workers, women human rights defenders and others who are most vulnerable to human rights violations, poverty, violence and discrimination should have a safe space given a voice in ASEAN. Policy makers must listen to them, and it is our responsibility as people’s movements to deliver their voices and recommendations to our political leaders”, says Nur Judy Abdullah, Council on Social Welfare, Brunei Darussalam.

Participants noted many similar struggles of women across the region such as: increasing use of women as cheap labour; militarisation and conflicts that fuel violence against women; multiple forms of discrimination due to women’s intersecting identities such as women with disability, indigenous women and women of diverse sexual orientation and gender identity; lack of control over women’s body to restrict women’s sexual and reproductive rights; and the exclusion of women in decision-making. “Women’s movement and transformative leadership has a crucial role and contribution and is growing in strength day after day. We demand that the governments in all ASEAN place women’s rights and women’s democratic participation at the centre of ASEAN’s work,” said Thida Khus of SILAKA, Cambodia.

The next ACSC/APF will be held in Burma/Myanmar in 2014, which this early is making not only the ASEAN but also the global community interested in having peoples’ gathering in a rapidly changing country.

“We are thrilled to take the leadership of organising this important annual forum where people from Southeast Asia gather to discuss our visions and aspirations for the future we want. An ASEAN community that guarantees a space where our voice can be heard and women become active decision-makers at home, in communities, at the national level and globally.”  Says May May Pyone of NGO Gender Group, Burma/ Myanmar.

For further information contact:
apwld@apwld.org/
+66 53 284 527


 


 
 
workers’ access to justice and provide redress, remedies and other support services for those whose rights
have been violated,” said Chang Jordan of Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau (WLB), Philippines.
“Domestic workers, women human rights defenders and others who are most vulnerable to human rights
violations, poverty, violence and discrimination should have a safe space given a voice in ASEAN. Policy
makers must listen to them, and it is our responsibility as people’s movements to deliver their voices and
recommendations to our political leaders”, says Nur Judy Abdullah, Council on Social Welfare, Brunei
Darussalam.
Participants noted many similar struggles of women across the region such as: increasing use of women as
cheap labour; militarisation and conflicts that fuel violence against women; multiple forms of discrimination
due to women’s intersecting identities such as women with disability, indigenous women and women of 
diverse sexual orientation and gender identity; lack of control over women’s body to restrict women’s
sexual and reproductive rights; and the exclusion of women in decision-making. “Women’s movement and
transformative leadership has a crucial role and contribution and is growing in strength day after day. We
demand that the governments in all ASEAN place women’s rights and women’s democratic participation at
the centre of ASEAN’s work,” said Thida Khus of SILAKA, Cambodia.
The next ACSC/APF will be held in Burma/Myanmar in 2014, which this early is making not only the ASEAN
but also the global community interested in having peoples’ gathering in a rapidly changing country.
“We are thrilled to take the leadership of organising this important annual forum where people from
Southeast Asia gather to discuss our visions and aspirations for the future we want. An ASEAN community
that guarantees a space where our voice can be heard and women become active decision-makers at
home, in communities, at the national level and globally.
” 
Says May May Pyone of NGO Gender Group,
Burma/ Myanmar.
For further information contact:
apwld@apwld.org/
+66 53 284 527

Bookmark and Share