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Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Have you been denied medical treatment in WORLD because of your sexual orientation?

The majority of people visiting this site have said No

No (57%) Yes, the doctor told me I couldn’t be treated because of my sexual orientation (28%) Yes, but without explanation (14%) Yes (0 %)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in WORLD...
jennifer (user currently living in SOUTH AFRICA) posted for intersex readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 02/04/2013 +5
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please im asking you yet so nicely to take off my story underneath jennifer please.........im getting into lots of trouble my career is being detroyed why you doing this i asked you years ago too please i beg you remove it .......even for relationships due to my story i am getting lifelong now problems why are you torturing me. im sure you realize whats this doing to me please. thanks a lot......
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jennifer (user currently living in SOUTH AFRICA) posted for intersex readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 02/04/2013 +5
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please im asking you yet so nicely to take off my story underneath jennifer please.........im getting into lots of trouble my career is being detroyed why you doing this i asked you years ago too please i beg you remove it .......even for relationships due to my story i am getting lifelong now problems why are you torturing me. im sure you realize whats this doing to me please. thanks a lot......
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Umar (user currently living in HAITI) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 09/10/2013
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"It isn't ideology that keeps it under wraps for annyoe I know; it's a credible threat (e.g. you will get fired or publicly humiliated and subjected to Maoist-style self-criticism sessions)."There's nothing you can do to avoid this, bill. The cultural purification rites fall on the PC and conservative alike. For some reason, even when I was fresh out of college and rather liberal, I was never safe from the denizens of big city multiculturalism. I was considered cool by the gays and nonwhites in the university town where I lived while finishing my BA but once I returned to to my hometown I was subjected to mockery and all kinds of accusations from latent homophobery to snobbery. Finally, when I could take no more, being the vile white biggot no matter how I voted or who I dated, I started thinking and saying the things I had been accused of all along. You have survived this long without being under suspicion, bill. I think you will do fine but should probably either homeschool your children or move elsewhere. It's the being suspect part that puts you in most danger b/c the forces of multiculturalism will needle you until you actually do hate them. I can only conclude that they need a common enemy to rally against otherwise why polarize minor differences into hostile opposition. I think I could have avoided this cruel twist of fate by either staying in the liberal university town after graduation or moving almost anywhere other than where I had been raised. I guess I had inadvertently become identified with the enemy social class due to accent, high school attended, mode of dress, etc. Perhaps if I gone a few miles further away from home to start my adult life, none of these traits would've had any significance to my coworkers. Still, I advise you to keep a low profile and move as soon as possible, no sense staying in harm's way.
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Angelarana (user currently living in COOK ISLANDS) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 10/10/2013
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Phitlok (user currently living in TOGO) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 11/10/2013
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A close friend of mine in high scohol his family were members at our church had a mother who was a hermaphrodite (her term, which I just realized may know be out-of-date). No one in our community knew that my friend's mother was actually her biological father. Her biological mother died when she was a young child, at which point, her father decided that, if he was going to be a healthy well-adjusted single parent to healthy well-adjusted children, he needed to come to grips with his sexual identity. Having always felt more female than male, he had a great deal of medical testing done, found out that he did indeed have two X chromosomes, and underwent a process to remove or suppress his/her male hormones genitalia. Unfortunately, living in a small, conservative community in the South, their family was soon so ostracized and persecuted that my friend's mother's therapist and minister advised her to relocate to a more liberal community, hide her gendered past and never reveal it again.Fortunately, after a number of years of becoming a beloved member of our church family, she finally felt safe enough to reveal her secret. After a lot of research to better understand her situation and the trauma she'd experienced over her lifetime, our church family was able to more fully embrace and support the entire family. She is actually now a missionary overseas, and she has three amazing children, along with several beautiful grandkids.So, yeah, I guess I've heard of this before. http://ubndzkbbuk.com [url=http://dwdyvlp.com]dwdyvlp[/url] [link=http://jfbeqznans.com]jfbeqznans[/link]
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Camila (user currently living in KAZAKHSTAN) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 12/10/2013
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Point taken, but consider this:<a href="http://giuqpxtyjuy.com"> etlcxay</a> how long do we let "questioning" people live in denial -- until their lives are practicaly over and there's little if any chance for them to enjoy self-acceptance, let alone a satisfying relationship with another person? I mean, this is the 21st century, forty years after Stonewall! You're absolutely right that it's internalized homophobia and shame etc,. that keeps them from fully acknowledging their sexuality, so all Out and Proud people can do is show by example that it's Okay to be Gay and makes no sense to live a life in a closet of denial and shame. You're right that I don't mean to be insensitive -- it's actually more sad than funny that some seniors still can't come to grips with who and what they are. But anything that can be done to help them face reality -- and the fact that that reality not only isn't so bad, but can be very good -- should be done. If we just let them stay comfortable in their Q "niche," how can they ever feel good about themselves? How can they feel part of a community, or ultimately in some way join the struggle for Gay/LGBT Rights [even if it's just coming out to freinds and family)? Your comment is appreciated, and I'm glad you read Gay "Dr. Bill!" What a fellow!
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Alexandre (user currently living in EL SALVADOR) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 13/10/2013
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Deena (user currently living in GUADELOUPE) posted for readers to the SOUTH AFRICA country page on 05/03/2014
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