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UGANDA

Male to Male relationships: Not Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: Imprisonment of 10 years or more
Female to Female Relationships: Not Legal
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: No law
Gay or lesbian able to serve in the armed forces: No

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Have you adopted as an LGBTI person in UGANDA?

The majority of people visiting this site have said I would like to but it is illegal

I would like to but it is illegal (71%) Tried, but denied (0 %) Yes (0 %) Yes, with my partner (0 %) Never tried (28%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in UGANDA...
Elvis Kiwanuka (user currently living in UGANDA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex readers on 16/05/2013 +5
link
Press Release to ILGA from LGBTI Uganda
The month of May started on a tough note concerning LGBT rights for gay Ugandans. Two groups of athletes registered to participate in Gay Sports in France and Germany were denied visas in spite of fulfilling all requirements established by both embassies.
LGBTI Uganda had registered a women’s volley ball team to compete in the Saaleperlen Games in Leipzig, Germany, between the 15th -20th May 2013. Out of the 8 applicants; including a Badminton Team for men, only 3 persons were granted visas! These included two men, for Badminton, and 1 woman, the captain, for the Volley Ball Women’s team.
This was a great shock to the 5 women who had spent weeks under intense training. The team immediately hired a lawyer to help with the appeal process, since the games were about 2 weeks away. To the team’s surprise, the embassy insisted the appeal process would last 4 weeks, a time frame which wouldn’t allow them participate in the games and a workshop organized for them on: How to Survive in an Extremely Homophobic Environment.
As expected, the organizers too where not impressed by the decision. But to their further surprise, most of their protest emails got no feedback except one that made it categorically clear that the embassy ‘deals with applicants, not third parties’. Protest letters to the German Foreign Affairs ministry were met with excuses too; all authority, with regards to visas is handled by local embassies.
In earlier correspondences between the organizers and the LGBTI Uganda team, one of the organizers noted that there could be some local staff at the German embassy that were opposed to Gay Rights and that the team should exercise the necessary precautions. Unfortunately, the team didn’t take the caution seriously until a senior native employee at the German embassy called some of the female players and preached to them for several minutes begging them “in God’s name to repent”. At the end of their submission, another called one of the two male players and told him that the team was not “presentable enough”.
The reasons given for the denial of visas were:
1. Lack of sufficient proof of means to sustain themselves while in Germany.
2. Lack of proof that the team would leave Germany upon completion of the games.
3. Lack of sufficient attachment to their country to enable them return home etc….
But team LGBTI Uganda has been to Sweden, Netherlands and in several parts of Uganda. This team had gotten a local sponsor for the German games who offered to buy return air tickets and 200 Euros per participant in pocket money. The organizers in Leipzig too, sent letters confirming the availability of meals and full accommodation for the team. Besides, every team member had health travel insurance worth the required 30,000 Euros.
Then, with the help of the team’s lawyer, affidavits were sworn by all athletes pledging to leave Germany upon the end of the games. And family photos were attached together with properties, birth certificates of dependants, personal bank statements etc…
Up to today, however, there is no word on the fate of the 5 female volley ball players from the German Embassy in Kampala. Why is this so? We are sure they are waiting for the mandatory 4 weeks to expire.
On the side of the French Embassy, all three LGBTI Uganda athletes were turned down. The same reasons were given like the Germans. Yet even after proving that 2 of the 3 were student finalists who couldn’t just abandon their studies, the embassy remained adamant. Even when the remaining athlete proved that he had a stable job with a very good remuneration package and assets, the answer was a resounding no!
The 3 had been registered by LBTI Uganda to participate in Mountain Biking and Squash in the Tournoi International de Paris 2013 happening between 14th -20th May 2013 in Paris. The organizers gave full proof of accommodation and meals, and the participants equally proved their capacity to attend, return home and continue with their life here in Uganda. The team’s sponsor too accepted to offer air tickets and ample pocket money on condition that LGBTI Uganda guaranteed participants would honor their obligations.
It’s a pity that the German and French Embassies have turned their backs on gay Ugandans despite of the fact that they are in full knowledge of the high levels of homophobia in this country. The teams strongly believe, that in sports, they would interact with their like; exchange ideas and draw support from one another. The teams believe that participating in these sports would be a huge blow to homophobia in Uganda. The teams strongly believe that sports would defeat hate with love, condemnation with compassion, discrimination with understanding.
And while the teams remain in the depths of the dark corners of homophobia itself; they remain strong in spirit and forever indebted to the organizers in France, like Antoine Le Blanc and Hubert Quarantel-Colombani together with Matthias Lendner of Germany. Thank you for all your efforts.

Elvis Kiwanuka
National Coordinator
LGBTI Uganda
add response to story
Elvis Kiwanuka (user currently living in UGANDA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex readers on 16/05/2013 +5
link
Press Release to ILGA from LGBTI Uganda
The month of May started on a tough note concerning LGBT rights for gay Ugandans. Two groups of athletes registered to participate in Gay Sports in France and Germany were denied visas in spite of fulfilling all requirements established by both embassies.
LGBTI Uganda had registered a women’s volley ball team to compete in the Saaleperlen Games in Leipzig, Germany, between the 15th -20th May 2013. Out of the 8 applicants; including a Badminton Team for men, only 3 persons were granted visas! These included two men, for Badminton, and 1 woman, the captain, for the Volley Ball Women’s team.
This was a great shock to the 5 women who had spent weeks under intense training. The team immediately hired a lawyer to help with the appeal process, since the games were about 2 weeks away. To the team’s surprise, the embassy insisted the appeal process would last 4 weeks, a time frame which wouldn’t allow them participate in the games and a workshop organized for them on: How to Survive in an Extremely Homophobic Environment.
As expected, the organizers too where not impressed by the decision. But to their further surprise, most of their protest emails got no feedback except one that made it categorically clear that the embassy ‘deals with applicants, not third parties’. Protest letters to the German Foreign Affairs ministry were met with excuses too; all authority, with regards to visas is handled by local embassies.
In earlier correspondences between the organizers and the LGBTI Uganda team, one of the organizers noted that there could be some local staff at the German embassy that were opposed to Gay Rights and that the team should exercise the necessary precautions. Unfortunately, the team didn’t take the caution seriously until a senior native employee at the German embassy called some of the female players and preached to them for several minutes begging them “in God’s name to repent”. At the end of their submission, another called one of the two male players and told him that the team was not “presentable enough”.
The reasons given for the denial of visas were:
1. Lack of sufficient proof of means to sustain themselves while in Germany.
2. Lack of proof that the team would leave Germany upon completion of the games.
3. Lack of sufficient attachment to their country to enable them return home etc….
But team LGBTI Uganda has been to Sweden, Netherlands and in several parts of Uganda. This team had gotten a local sponsor for the German games who offered to buy return air tickets and 200 Euros per participant in pocket money. The organizers in Leipzig too, sent letters confirming the availability of meals and full accommodation for the team. Besides, every team member had health travel insurance worth the required 30,000 Euros.
Then, with the help of the team’s lawyer, affidavits were sworn by all athletes pledging to leave Germany upon the end of the games. And family photos were attached together with properties, birth certificates of dependants, personal bank statements etc…
Up to today, however, there is no word on the fate of the 5 female volley ball players from the German Embassy in Kampala. Why is this so? We are sure they are waiting for the mandatory 4 weeks to expire.
On the side of the French Embassy, all three LGBTI Uganda athletes were turned down. The same reasons were given like the Germans. Yet even after proving that 2 of the 3 were student finalists who couldn’t just abandon their studies, the embassy remained adamant. Even when the remaining athlete proved that he had a stable job with a very good remuneration package and assets, the answer was a resounding no!
The 3 had been registered by LBTI Uganda to participate in Mountain Biking and Squash in the Tournoi International de Paris 2013 happening between 14th -20th May 2013 in Paris. The organizers gave full proof of accommodation and meals, and the participants equally proved their capacity to attend, return home and continue with their life here in Uganda. The team’s sponsor too accepted to offer air tickets and ample pocket money on condition that LGBTI Uganda guaranteed participants would honor their obligations.
It’s a pity that the German and French Embassies have turned their backs on gay Ugandans despite of the fact that they are in full knowledge of the high levels of homophobia in this country. The teams strongly believe, that in sports, they would interact with their like; exchange ideas and draw support from one another. The teams believe that participating in these sports would be a huge blow to homophobia in Uganda. The teams strongly believe that sports would defeat hate with love, condemnation with compassion, discrimination with understanding.
And while the teams remain in the depths of the dark corners of homophobia itself; they remain strong in spirit and forever indebted to the organizers in France, like Antoine Le Blanc and Hubert Quarantel-Colombani together with Matthias Lendner of Germany. Thank you for all your efforts.

Elvis Kiwanuka
National Coordinator
LGBTI Uganda
add response to story
add response to story
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