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SOUTH AFRICA

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Age of consent: Equal for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: Recognized on national level
Is it possible to change your gender on official documents?: Yes

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Has your sexual orientation affected your job in SOUTH AFRICA? Do you feel limited in your career by your sexual orientation?

The majority of people visiting this site have said I have not been limited by my sexual orientation, though I am out at work

In too many ways to count (0 %) I changed careers because of my sexual orientation (0 %) I feel that I wasn’t promoted because I am lesbian or gay (0 %) My co-workers harass me because of my sexual orientation (40%) I have not been limited by my sexual orientation, though I am out at work (60%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in SOUTH AFRICA...
Umar (user currently living in HAITI) posted for readers in response to this story on 09/10/2013
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"It isn't ideology that keeps it under wraps for annyoe I know; it's a credible threat (e.g. you will get fired or publicly humiliated and subjected to Maoist-style self-criticism sessions)."There's nothing you can do to avoid this, bill. The cultural purification rites fall on the PC and conservative alike. For some reason, even when I was fresh out of college and rather liberal, I was never safe from the denizens of big city multiculturalism. I was considered cool by the gays and nonwhites in the university town where I lived while finishing my BA but once I returned to to my hometown I was subjected to mockery and all kinds of accusations from latent homophobery to snobbery. Finally, when I could take no more, being the vile white biggot no matter how I voted or who I dated, I started thinking and saying the things I had been accused of all along. You have survived this long without being under suspicion, bill. I think you will do fine but should probably either homeschool your children or move elsewhere. It's the being suspect part that puts you in most danger b/c the forces of multiculturalism will needle you until you actually do hate them. I can only conclude that they need a common enemy to rally against otherwise why polarize minor differences into hostile opposition. I think I could have avoided this cruel twist of fate by either staying in the liberal university town after graduation or moving almost anywhere other than where I had been raised. I guess I had inadvertently become identified with the enemy social class due to accent, high school attended, mode of dress, etc. Perhaps if I gone a few miles further away from home to start my adult life, none of these traits would've had any significance to my coworkers. Still, I advise you to keep a low profile and move as soon as possible, no sense staying in harm's way.
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Umar (user currently living in HAITI) posted for readers in response to this story on 09/10/2013
link
"It isn't ideology that keeps it under wraps for annyoe I know; it's a credible threat (e.g. you will get fired or publicly humiliated and subjected to Maoist-style self-criticism sessions)."There's nothing you can do to avoid this, bill. The cultural purification rites fall on the PC and conservative alike. For some reason, even when I was fresh out of college and rather liberal, I was never safe from the denizens of big city multiculturalism. I was considered cool by the gays and nonwhites in the university town where I lived while finishing my BA but once I returned to to my hometown I was subjected to mockery and all kinds of accusations from latent homophobery to snobbery. Finally, when I could take no more, being the vile white biggot no matter how I voted or who I dated, I started thinking and saying the things I had been accused of all along. You have survived this long without being under suspicion, bill. I think you will do fine but should probably either homeschool your children or move elsewhere. It's the being suspect part that puts you in most danger b/c the forces of multiculturalism will needle you until you actually do hate them. I can only conclude that they need a common enemy to rally against otherwise why polarize minor differences into hostile opposition. I think I could have avoided this cruel twist of fate by either staying in the liberal university town after graduation or moving almost anywhere other than where I had been raised. I guess I had inadvertently become identified with the enemy social class due to accent, high school attended, mode of dress, etc. Perhaps if I gone a few miles further away from home to start my adult life, none of these traits would've had any significance to my coworkers. Still, I advise you to keep a low profile and move as soon as possible, no sense staying in harm's way.
view entire thread
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