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SIERRA LEONE

Male to Male relationships: Not Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: Imprisonment of 10 years or more
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: No law

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

How common are trainings on diversity that include sexual orientation and gender identity in the schools of SIERRA LEONE?
We don’t have trainings (0 %) Training occur infrequently, and don’t include sexual orientation or gender identity (0 %) Training occur, but don’t necessarily include sexual orientation or gender identity (0 %) Trainings always include sexual orientation or gender identity (0 %)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in SIERRA LEONE...
M S Kamara (user currently living in UNITED KINGDOM) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 17/06/2013 +5
link
GAY RIGHTS ADVOCACY IN SIERRA LEONE

My work and activities with different local and international organisations raised my awareness about people’s rights, especially gay (homosexual) rights. There is no law that prohibits gay practice in Sierra Leone. Our politicians do not do a thing to promote gay rights.

The very few, like me, who are brave enough to advocate for gay right expose ourselves to persecutions, threats, attacks, provocations and ridicule.

I became embolden in the fight for gay rights when David Cameron, the British prime minister issued a statement at a world summit to let African leaders support gay rights or risk losing funds from the UK Government. I realised that the advocacy for gay rights has reached international proportions. I intensified my gay rights activities but came under more pressure from people who hate gays.

Sierra Leone Lesbian and Gay Association (SLLAGA) who was brutally raped and murdered in her office on the 28/29 September 2004. She had spent time in Southern Africa as a refugee from hostilities in Seirra Leone where she used her time to learn how to ‘mobilise in a hostile environment’ This is what she did on her return home, setting up SLLAGA.

Fanny Ann made a submission to the UN Committee on Human rights at the Geneva meeting in April 2004 which discussed the Brazilian Resolution, which would have acknowledged sexual orientation as a legitimate human right. In her presentation she highlighted the violence and state-sponsored oppression that lesbian and gay people face in many parts of Africa. She concluded:

I now realised why people and groups that try to advocate gay rights quickly abandon their programs and activities.

There are many vigilante religious fundamentalists so be very careful.
add response to story
M S Kamara (user currently living in UNITED KINGDOM) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 17/06/2013 +5
link
GAY RIGHTS ADVOCACY IN SIERRA LEONE

My work and activities with different local and international organisations raised my awareness about people’s rights, especially gay (homosexual) rights. There is no law that prohibits gay practice in Sierra Leone. Our politicians do not do a thing to promote gay rights.

The very few, like me, who are brave enough to advocate for gay right expose ourselves to persecutions, threats, attacks, provocations and ridicule.

I became embolden in the fight for gay rights when David Cameron, the British prime minister issued a statement at a world summit to let African leaders support gay rights or risk losing funds from the UK Government. I realised that the advocacy for gay rights has reached international proportions. I intensified my gay rights activities but came under more pressure from people who hate gays.

Sierra Leone Lesbian and Gay Association (SLLAGA) who was brutally raped and murdered in her office on the 28/29 September 2004. She had spent time in Southern Africa as a refugee from hostilities in Seirra Leone where she used her time to learn how to ‘mobilise in a hostile environment’ This is what she did on her return home, setting up SLLAGA.

Fanny Ann made a submission to the UN Committee on Human rights at the Geneva meeting in April 2004 which discussed the Brazilian Resolution, which would have acknowledged sexual orientation as a legitimate human right. In her presentation she highlighted the violence and state-sponsored oppression that lesbian and gay people face in many parts of Africa. She concluded:

I now realised why people and groups that try to advocate gay rights quickly abandon their programs and activities.

There are many vigilante religious fundamentalists so be very careful.
add response to story
add response to story
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