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NORWAY

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Age of consent: Equal for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: Recognized on national level

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Is your healthcare affected by your sexual orientation or gender identity in NORWAY?

The majority of people visiting this site have said No, my healthcare is the same

Yes, it is more expensive (0 %) Yes, I was dropped from my insurance plan (0 %) My coverage is different because of my sexual orientation (20%) No, my healthcare is the same (80%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in NORWAY...
(user currently living in NORWAY) posted for lesbian readers on 09/08/2010 tagged with tourism, teaching lgbt rights in schools, hate crime and violence prevention, human rights +5
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Hi - this story is really not very terrible,it all went well, but it's just a proof that even if we pride ourselves in beeing tolerant and non-homophobic here in Norway many people are not. In my city, in Bergen at the west-coast of Norway me and my girlfriend( I'm 38 - she's 30) were walking to our car after an evening at the cinema, about 9 o'clock in the evening and we just instinctively held hands and looked at each other smiling like we were in love - cause we were :) And then I feel someone comig up really close behind me, giggling, and there are two men or boys rather,about 18-19 ys old, obviously of foreign descent, Turkish or Iranian or Greek I don't know for sure - no offence meant, but their parents was not Norwegian anyway....Well - they were pretending to be lovers and walked in an effeminate way and they were laughing of us without a doubt.Now I'm a teacher and I'm used to correct bad behaviour with adolescents,and I am not afraid of young boys, so I stopped quickly and turned and got veeery close to the face of one of them and said DO WE HAVE A PROBLEM HERE? and then they shrieked like girls and ran away giggling. But later I was afraid, you know, there were about 10-15 friends of them at the other side of the street and they could easily have given us a good beating if they wanted to, or made a very unpleasant situation for us. I think it's a good thing that Norway welcome foreign people who needs freedom from oppression in their own country but then they have to stop suppressing us with everyday bullying like these kids did to us. We cannot hold hands like a normal couple on the streets and we never ever do again. I'm sorry for that :( Foreign people who wants to live in Norway MUST teach their children tolerance of LHBT people as well, or we will get a setback in all the important progress that has been done bye the lhbt movement over the years.
thanks for listening :)
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(user currently living in NORWAY) posted for lesbian readers on 09/08/2010 tagged with tourism, teaching lgbt rights in schools, hate crime and violence prevention, human rights +5
link
Hi - this story is really not very terrible,it all went well, but it's just a proof that even if we pride ourselves in beeing tolerant and non-homophobic here in Norway many people are not. In my city, in Bergen at the west-coast of Norway me and my girlfriend( I'm 38 - she's 30) were walking to our car after an evening at the cinema, about 9 o'clock in the evening and we just instinctively held hands and looked at each other smiling like we were in love - cause we were :) And then I feel someone comig up really close behind me, giggling, and there are two men or boys rather,about 18-19 ys old, obviously of foreign descent, Turkish or Iranian or Greek I don't know for sure - no offence meant, but their parents was not Norwegian anyway....Well - they were pretending to be lovers and walked in an effeminate way and they were laughing of us without a doubt.Now I'm a teacher and I'm used to correct bad behaviour with adolescents,and I am not afraid of young boys, so I stopped quickly and turned and got veeery close to the face of one of them and said DO WE HAVE A PROBLEM HERE? and then they shrieked like girls and ran away giggling. But later I was afraid, you know, there were about 10-15 friends of them at the other side of the street and they could easily have given us a good beating if they wanted to, or made a very unpleasant situation for us. I think it's a good thing that Norway welcome foreign people who needs freedom from oppression in their own country but then they have to stop suppressing us with everyday bullying like these kids did to us. We cannot hold hands like a normal couple on the streets and we never ever do again. I'm sorry for that :( Foreign people who wants to live in Norway MUST teach their children tolerance of LHBT people as well, or we will get a setback in all the important progress that has been done bye the lhbt movement over the years.
thanks for listening :)
add response to story
add response to story
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