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LITHUANIA

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Age of consent: Equal for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: No law

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Have you been the victim of violence because of your sexual orientation in LITHUANIA?

The majority of people visiting this site have said No

Yes, I don’t ever feel safe (0 %) Yes, by individuals (0 %) Yes, by a group (0 %) Yes, by the police (0 %) No (100%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
Post a new story to this section

Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in LITHUANIA...
Lithuanian Gay League (user currently living in LITHUANIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 23/04/2012 +5
link
US Ambassador to Lithuania highlights LGBT-friendly policy

In a recent interview given to Lithuanian news portal 15min.lt, United States Ambassador to Lithuania Anne E. Derse discussed among other things LGBT rights in the US and in Lithuania.

She talked about the current US administration’s commitment to LGBT rights, stressing that it is a core part of the US foreign policy to promote human rights also in countries with which it has relationships: “Secretary Clinton gave a speech on December 6 where she stated very clearly that we believe LGBT rights are human rights. We believe that LGBT people have the same right as everyone else to live in safety, in security, exercise all of their human rights to not be discriminated against.”

Answering a question on whether legal partnership is part of these rights, the Ambassador stated that every country has to decide for itself on these social questions, adding however that gay people have a right like everyone else to exercise their fundamental human rights, which is a fact that no-one should question.

“Secretary Clinton, in her speech on December 6, said that when you don't understand something, when it's different and strange and maybe considered alien to traditional values, it's scary, it's frightening. But in fact homosexuality is a human reality, she said, and it exists in every country in the world. And we're talking about real people, we're talking about kids in high school who might be discovering that they're homosexual. How do they feel? Are they bullied, do they feel isolated and alone? We know in the United States that there have been hate crimes, kids have died, or committed suicide, because they feel alienated. That's simply wrong. We know how parents feel when they discover that maybe they have a homosexual child. These are real human situations. This is the reality, it's not some, excuse me for using this term, ancient Soviet notion of scary.”

The Ambassador talked about debates on these issues in the US, mentioning as an example the military’s recently repealed Don't Ask Don't Tell policy, which has proved to work despite a great deal of initial concern.

The Ambassador said she is following homophobic legislative proposals pending in the Lithuanian Parliament and that her embassy in line with the Secretary of State’s policy will work against any attempts to criminalize homosexuality, working with partners in government, in media and in NGOs.

According to the Ambassador, this year’s Freedom March organised in Vilnius to celebrate Lithuanian independence day is a positive development: “The US condemns manifestations of antisemitism or homophobia or xenophobia everywhere in the world and we applaud when people celebrate freedom and democracy.”
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Lithuanian Gay League (user currently living in LITHUANIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 23/04/2012 +5
link
US Ambassador to Lithuania highlights LGBT-friendly policy

In a recent interview given to Lithuanian news portal 15min.lt, United States Ambassador to Lithuania Anne E. Derse discussed among other things LGBT rights in the US and in Lithuania.

She talked about the current US administration’s commitment to LGBT rights, stressing that it is a core part of the US foreign policy to promote human rights also in countries with which it has relationships: “Secretary Clinton gave a speech on December 6 where she stated very clearly that we believe LGBT rights are human rights. We believe that LGBT people have the same right as everyone else to live in safety, in security, exercise all of their human rights to not be discriminated against.”

Answering a question on whether legal partnership is part of these rights, the Ambassador stated that every country has to decide for itself on these social questions, adding however that gay people have a right like everyone else to exercise their fundamental human rights, which is a fact that no-one should question.

“Secretary Clinton, in her speech on December 6, said that when you don't understand something, when it's different and strange and maybe considered alien to traditional values, it's scary, it's frightening. But in fact homosexuality is a human reality, she said, and it exists in every country in the world. And we're talking about real people, we're talking about kids in high school who might be discovering that they're homosexual. How do they feel? Are they bullied, do they feel isolated and alone? We know in the United States that there have been hate crimes, kids have died, or committed suicide, because they feel alienated. That's simply wrong. We know how parents feel when they discover that maybe they have a homosexual child. These are real human situations. This is the reality, it's not some, excuse me for using this term, ancient Soviet notion of scary.”

The Ambassador talked about debates on these issues in the US, mentioning as an example the military’s recently repealed Don't Ask Don't Tell policy, which has proved to work despite a great deal of initial concern.

The Ambassador said she is following homophobic legislative proposals pending in the Lithuanian Parliament and that her embassy in line with the Secretary of State’s policy will work against any attempts to criminalize homosexuality, working with partners in government, in media and in NGOs.

According to the Ambassador, this year’s Freedom March organised in Vilnius to celebrate Lithuanian independence day is a positive development: “The US condemns manifestations of antisemitism or homophobia or xenophobia everywhere in the world and we applaud when people celebrate freedom and democracy.”
add response to story
add response to story
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