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ITALY

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Age of consent: Equal for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: No law

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Traveled to ITALY? Did you feel comfortable as a trans person while there?

The majority of people visiting this site have said I felt comfortable at the hotel, but nowhere else

I did not feel comfortable at all (0 %) I felt comfortable at the hotel, but nowhere else (100%) Only immigration authorities made me uncomfortable (0 %) I had no problems as a trans person (0 %)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in ITALY...
(user currently living in ITALY) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 19/08/2010
link
Good news doesn’t make headlines: 2009 Torino Pride a huge success
50,000 demand equal rights and action against homophobia, transphobia and discrimination
Rainbow banner unfurled at City Hall
Pride season opens to cheering crowds

Heading the 2009 Torino Pride march through downtown Turin were two roll-outs – “Things are Different in Europe” and “Equality not Comprises” – both clearly signalling an urgent need for concerted action to bring forward legislation to combat discrimination. The demonstration drew an estimated 50,000 marchers and onlookers; nearly 5000 attended the post-demo party in the Cortile del Maglio in the Peace Arsenal, a former arms factory, and adjoining Balôn, Turin’s flea market, decorated in fuchsia for the occasion, with partygoers sporting Pride pins, T-shirts, and stickers.

At the focal point of the two weeks of events leading up to Saturday’s demonstration-celebration was the fight against homophobia, transphobia and discrimination. One of the initiatives, the UniPRIDE set for the day before at the Palazzo Nuovo, housing the liberal arts college of the University of Turin, was suspended when the Rector ordered the building closed for security reasons connected with the G8 University Rectors meeting. But thanks to the tenacious efforts of La Jungla, a newly formed LGBT association, a one-day program of seminars, film screenings, and performances was held the following Friday.

This year’s Pride took issue with Italy’s institutions which are still rife with homophobia and transphobia; but it also looked beyond the stalemate at home to see what other European countries and European Community instances have done as benchmarks for obtaining rights and legislation Italy has been reluctant to put on the political agenda.

Supported by the regional, provincial and municipal administrations, all events were fully self-financed by the Coordinamento Tornio Pride, which will publicly disclose a financial statement of its activities. True, it takes money to do politics and culture. But even more so, it takes people who are ready to pitch in with donations or by volunteering their time and energy.

The Coordinamento Torino Pride therefore wishes to thank:
- the countless people who rallied in support of equal rights and against discrimination, but also demonstrated the emotive-cohesive force of music and dance inherent in political action.
- the regional councillors of both the majority and the opposition who participated in a meeting with LGBT associations to explain why the draft of the regional bill against discrimination has not yet been discussed in the Regional Council. The outcome of this first-ever encounter holds promise for real change.
- the President of the Region of Piemonte, Mercedes Bresso, for keeping her promise to formally request that the bill be put on the agenda for the Regional Council’s next meeting.
- the mayor of Turin, Sergio Chiamparino, for granting permission to unfurl the 50-meter long rainbow banner from the balcony of City Hall where the enthusiastic crowd in the square below could proudly witness the final moment of the march.
- the Association of Workers in the Metallurgical Industries for having sent an official delegation to take part in the demonstration, as well as the General Federation of Italian Trade Unions, ARCI, the associations under the Council for Laicality of State Institutions, numerous other associations, social youth centres, political parties, personalities from the world of culture, entertainment, national and regional clubs and associations, the Public Assistance Organizations of Piemonte, Blackcat Italia Cheerleaders, and Hydra Service.
- the representatives of the immigrant communities in Turin, who responded to our appeal to join in the fight against homophobia and transphobia.
- the many, many volunteers who made the event possible.

The Coordinamento Torino Pride opens the Pride season in Italy in the hope that with the growing broad-based engagement in the fight against discrimination directed at gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual persons will come an adequate political response.

Coordinamento Torino Pride
May 2009
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(user currently living in ITALY) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 19/08/2010
link
Good news doesn’t make headlines: 2009 Torino Pride a huge success
50,000 demand equal rights and action against homophobia, transphobia and discrimination
Rainbow banner unfurled at City Hall
Pride season opens to cheering crowds

Heading the 2009 Torino Pride march through downtown Turin were two roll-outs – “Things are Different in Europe” and “Equality not Comprises” – both clearly signalling an urgent need for concerted action to bring forward legislation to combat discrimination. The demonstration drew an estimated 50,000 marchers and onlookers; nearly 5000 attended the post-demo party in the Cortile del Maglio in the Peace Arsenal, a former arms factory, and adjoining Balôn, Turin’s flea market, decorated in fuchsia for the occasion, with partygoers sporting Pride pins, T-shirts, and stickers.

At the focal point of the two weeks of events leading up to Saturday’s demonstration-celebration was the fight against homophobia, transphobia and discrimination. One of the initiatives, the UniPRIDE set for the day before at the Palazzo Nuovo, housing the liberal arts college of the University of Turin, was suspended when the Rector ordered the building closed for security reasons connected with the G8 University Rectors meeting. But thanks to the tenacious efforts of La Jungla, a newly formed LGBT association, a one-day program of seminars, film screenings, and performances was held the following Friday.

This year’s Pride took issue with Italy’s institutions which are still rife with homophobia and transphobia; but it also looked beyond the stalemate at home to see what other European countries and European Community instances have done as benchmarks for obtaining rights and legislation Italy has been reluctant to put on the political agenda.

Supported by the regional, provincial and municipal administrations, all events were fully self-financed by the Coordinamento Tornio Pride, which will publicly disclose a financial statement of its activities. True, it takes money to do politics and culture. But even more so, it takes people who are ready to pitch in with donations or by volunteering their time and energy.

The Coordinamento Torino Pride therefore wishes to thank:
- the countless people who rallied in support of equal rights and against discrimination, but also demonstrated the emotive-cohesive force of music and dance inherent in political action.
- the regional councillors of both the majority and the opposition who participated in a meeting with LGBT associations to explain why the draft of the regional bill against discrimination has not yet been discussed in the Regional Council. The outcome of this first-ever encounter holds promise for real change.
- the President of the Region of Piemonte, Mercedes Bresso, for keeping her promise to formally request that the bill be put on the agenda for the Regional Council’s next meeting.
- the mayor of Turin, Sergio Chiamparino, for granting permission to unfurl the 50-meter long rainbow banner from the balcony of City Hall where the enthusiastic crowd in the square below could proudly witness the final moment of the march.
- the Association of Workers in the Metallurgical Industries for having sent an official delegation to take part in the demonstration, as well as the General Federation of Italian Trade Unions, ARCI, the associations under the Council for Laicality of State Institutions, numerous other associations, social youth centres, political parties, personalities from the world of culture, entertainment, national and regional clubs and associations, the Public Assistance Organizations of Piemonte, Blackcat Italia Cheerleaders, and Hydra Service.
- the representatives of the immigrant communities in Turin, who responded to our appeal to join in the fight against homophobia and transphobia.
- the many, many volunteers who made the event possible.

The Coordinamento Torino Pride opens the Pride season in Italy in the hope that with the growing broad-based engagement in the fight against discrimination directed at gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual persons will come an adequate political response.

Coordinamento Torino Pride
May 2009
add response to story
add response to story
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