Home, Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America and Caribbean, Oceania, News, Sitemap
Home / Indonesia / Your Stories
loading map..
The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
Post a new story to this section

Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in INDONESIA...
sort by: [most recent] [most popular]

showing stories 1-50

(user currently living in INDONESIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers in response to this story on 17/05/2014
link
Society will never realize or hear our suffering voices if we don't show them! We need a subversive method in bringing down propagandas the bullshit media have told us. We are a community, not just some social deviation. The first gay person to come out in a modern society is an existentialist (I think), so I think existentialism will be a good way to get by everyday life. It has always been your own opinions that matter, not theirs.
view entire thread
Michael (user currently living in INDONESIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 17/05/2014
link
Hello, this is a voice of a 16 year old boy suffering with schizophrenia and just happens to be gay. Wake up people, really? In the closet? Waiting for someone to frig you and that's it? I heard a story about the beaten ladyboy in Seminyak and I was really pissed. I think it's important for heteros to accept us (except those religious hard-liners who think sun revolves around earth, I mean...) But it's also important for us to unite. Why? I had a friend when I was in 9th grade, he was also gay. But he left me and told me he changed. He was one of my best friends and now he thinks I'm disgusting and immoral when we never did anything. It sucks really, because now he's living like a psycho. What sucks is that I think he was electroshocked or something. Oh and I hate school, they give sex ed that says AIDS is a gay disease. Wake up people! Read Oscar Wilde! Get out off the closet and into the streets!
add response to story
link
Under the Representations of Gender Believe System

Wisnu Adihartono Reksodirdjo is a PhD Candidate in sociology in Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) – Marseille, France.

I have much of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) friends in Indonesia, particularly in Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia, the city where I live. One day, one of my best friends in Senior High School came to Jakarta from Toronto (Canada). He asked me to have a coffee. I wondered since long time ago that he is gay, but since he did not tell me about his sexual orientation, I do not want to ask him first because I think that is not my business. When we were in school, I did not catch that he is gay because he acts like a macho man. He is handsome, gorgeous, chique and à la mode. He was such an idol. Since I heard from his classmate that he had a girlfriend, I assume that he is not gay.

The day that we met, we talked and shared about our lives, including our love lives. And finally he confessed that he is gay. He asked me why I did not shock. I told him that I already guessed his sexual orientation since we were in high school. He told me that he stays now in Toronto with his Canadian business men. They met in Bandung when my friend took his study in one of the best universities in Bandung. I asked him accidentally why he chosen Canada as his country of destination instead of Indonesia. He laughed and he said that is a moron question. I know that this type of question makes him laughed. He explained that it is very impossible to be gay in Indonesia. He added that when he comes out, State, society, and religion will totally reject his sexual orientation. Those three “things” automatically blocked the existence of LGBT peoples. They cannot express themselves and they do not have any access to fight their freedom. They will be stigmatized by society as a sick person. That is why he decided to move to other country to seek a freedom.

How the State and society create the system of differentiation between heterosexual peoples and homosexual peoples when in fact, in my opinion, we have avoided this. In a society, the creation of that system is made by the concept of social imagination, social representation, and gender belief system.

In a simple phrase, social representation by French social psychologist, Serge Moscovici is basically conceptualized as a concept to merge ideas and values in one package within society in sharing the experiences with the tool of social imagination.
Social imagination has a strong relation with how we set our mind. When we imagine something or someone, we use, indeed, our mind to produce and reproduce the beliefs, the “good”, the “bad”, and the “sinner”? In general, social imagination made us imagine what is “good” and what is “bad”. He can intervene in our everyday lives with their power of perception to make any opposition, for example to legitimate/to illegitimate, to justify/to accuse, to convince/to discriminate, to include/to exclude, etc.

Marked by a perception, social representations grow out of the discussions people pursue in making sense of their social lives.

This is what happened in Indonesia to address the issue of homosexuality. Social representations build a border between heterosexuals and homosexuals with a rigid system called gender belief system.

Basically, the gender system consists of an institutionalized set of social practices, used to distinguish between men and women, but also in the end, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT). This system used to organize the social relations on the basis of apparent difference and inequality. In other words, the gender system made a stereotype between human being. Derived from the idea of difference, it is clear that the gender system used the hegemony system as the ruling ideology.

The emergence of gender system through interaction between peoples creates a belief in defining gender. So, we can make an interpretation that in gender belief system, peoples must accept stereotypes as descriptive of most others and use those stereotypes to form performance expectations.

The homosexuality in Southeast Asia, in particular, develops within the framework of the concept described above, because for most of Southeast Asian peoples, sex categorization is automatic, fast, and unconscious where they cannot relate to another without first sex categorizing. As a PhD student in sociology from one of the countries in Southeast Asia, a change within our current gender system is difficult and very slow, but I believe it is not impossible.
add response to story
Kamilia (user currently living in INDONESIA) posted for lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 04/12/2010 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, sexual orientation
link
On October 29, 2010 Institut Pelangi Perempuan (Indonesian Youth LBT Women Center) launched the Yogyakarta Principles comic in Jakarta with some art and cultural performances presented by Indonesian youth LGBT. Even lately the fundamentalist groups are so aggressive to attack some LGBT events in Indonesia, IPP decided to keep moving forward and promote the Yogyakarta Principles.

"Yogyakarta Principles is a set of international principles relating to sexual orientation and gender identity, intended to address documented evidence of abuse of rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and further of intersexuality requested by Louise Arbour according to the International Human Rights Law. The outline of the Principles was drawn at a meeting of International Commission of Jurists and human rights experts from around the world at Gadjah Mada University on Java from 6 to 9 November in 2006. "It contains 29 Principles adopted unanimously by the experts, along with recommendations to governments, regional intergovernmental institutions, civil society, and the UN itself".

The comic book is initiated by Institut Pelangi Perempuan to disseminate information on The Yogyakarta Principles amongst young queer community in Indonesia. This book is an effort to “translate� the principles into a more youth friendly language. The story in this comic book is inspired by the real life story of a number of young queer women in Indonesia. Comic book was chosen as the media to explain The Yogyakarta Principles with the hope that it would be easier to comprehend as compared to brochures or pocket books.
add response to story
link
so far, my experience as a gay, which can also be spelled transsex in Indonesia, still free, still a lot of pressure that I've got. I wish I could join you all to be able to fight for gay equality. thanks.
add response to story
David Wainwright (user currently living in UNITED KINGDOM) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 07/04/2010 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, sexual orientation, marriage / civil unions, ilga asia conference, asia
link
they are still mobilising on facebook , many of my friends have reported their group for spreading hatred
also reported images and many gay people are now spreading the word about this group and posting pro gay stuff

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=92244551768&ref;=nf
add response to story
Bookmark and Share