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INDONESIA

Male to Male relationships: Legal only in some areas
Punishments for male to male relationships: Imprisonment of less than 10 years
Female to Female Relationships: Legal only in some areas
Age of consent: Different for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Is it possible to change your gender on official documents?: Yes, but only with sex reassignment surgery

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Do you feel safe when gathering with other LGBTI people in public spaces in INDONESIA?

The majority of people visiting this site have said No, there is no police protection

No, there is no police protection (50%) No, the police might harass us (0 %) No, owners of establishment won’t allow us to gather (0 %) Yes (50%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in INDONESIA...
Kamilia (user currently living in INDONESIA) posted for lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 04/12/2010 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, sexual orientation
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On October 29, 2010 Institut Pelangi Perempuan (Indonesian Youth LBT Women Center) launched the Yogyakarta Principles comic in Jakarta with some art and cultural performances presented by Indonesian youth LGBT. Even lately the fundamentalist groups are so aggressive to attack some LGBT events in Indonesia, IPP decided to keep moving forward and promote the Yogyakarta Principles.

"Yogyakarta Principles is a set of international principles relating to sexual orientation and gender identity, intended to address documented evidence of abuse of rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and further of intersexuality requested by Louise Arbour according to the International Human Rights Law. The outline of the Principles was drawn at a meeting of International Commission of Jurists and human rights experts from around the world at Gadjah Mada University on Java from 6 to 9 November in 2006. "It contains 29 Principles adopted unanimously by the experts, along with recommendations to governments, regional intergovernmental institutions, civil society, and the UN itself".

The comic book is initiated by Institut Pelangi Perempuan to disseminate information on The Yogyakarta Principles amongst young queer community in Indonesia. This book is an effort to “translate� the principles into a more youth friendly language. The story in this comic book is inspired by the real life story of a number of young queer women in Indonesia. Comic book was chosen as the media to explain The Yogyakarta Principles with the hope that it would be easier to comprehend as compared to brochures or pocket books.
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Kamilia (user currently living in INDONESIA) posted for lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 04/12/2010 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, sexual orientation
link
On October 29, 2010 Institut Pelangi Perempuan (Indonesian Youth LBT Women Center) launched the Yogyakarta Principles comic in Jakarta with some art and cultural performances presented by Indonesian youth LGBT. Even lately the fundamentalist groups are so aggressive to attack some LGBT events in Indonesia, IPP decided to keep moving forward and promote the Yogyakarta Principles.

"Yogyakarta Principles is a set of international principles relating to sexual orientation and gender identity, intended to address documented evidence of abuse of rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and further of intersexuality requested by Louise Arbour according to the International Human Rights Law. The outline of the Principles was drawn at a meeting of International Commission of Jurists and human rights experts from around the world at Gadjah Mada University on Java from 6 to 9 November in 2006. "It contains 29 Principles adopted unanimously by the experts, along with recommendations to governments, regional intergovernmental institutions, civil society, and the UN itself".

The comic book is initiated by Institut Pelangi Perempuan to disseminate information on The Yogyakarta Principles amongst young queer community in Indonesia. This book is an effort to “translate� the principles into a more youth friendly language. The story in this comic book is inspired by the real life story of a number of young queer women in Indonesia. Comic book was chosen as the media to explain The Yogyakarta Principles with the hope that it would be easier to comprehend as compared to brochures or pocket books.
add response to story
add response to story
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