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INDIA

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: No law
Is it possible to change your gender on official documents?: Only in some areas

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Has your LGBTI family been affected by your sexual orientation in INDIA?

The majority of people visiting this site have said Yes, my partner and I have been discriminated against

No (0 %) Yes, my partner and I have been discriminated against (50%) Yes, my children have been discriminated against (0 %) Yes, we have all been discriminated against (50%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in INDIA...
Bhagya Rajesh (user currently living in INDIA) posted for bisexual readers on 28/12/2013 tagged with sexual orientation +5
link
I come from India. To be precise from Kerala, in the extreme south. The community there is extremely literate and males and females enjoy equal status to some extent. Kerala is really different from the rest of India: developed but still holds on to old traditions. This has affected the life of all the people. Here parents choose your spouse. Sure you will have some say in it but essentially you meet a guy or girl via a broker or internet marriage sites(we have a lot of them in India), you talk to them maybe five or six times and a few months later you're married to them. The criteria for marriage here is education, wealth and beauty. If you have all three you are hot in the marriage market. Yes, here marriage is like a transaction, spoiled by the dowry system which still persists. The girl ends up in a house and has to live with her in-laws probably until her husband saves enough money to have a house of their own, which will probably take ten years.
Parents here say that if the children love them they will only marry the people their parents want them to marry. So if you are a straight guy or girl and falls in love with someone, you have to have some real courage because when your parents find out that you're in a relationship they will probably lock you up.
In a place like this being gay, bi or transgender is pretty hard. As if to add oil to the fire, the supreme court of India has recently withdrawn an order by a high court to dis-criminalize gay sex. They still categorize gay sex with that of sex with animals.
The religious leaders are saying that gays disturb the natural order of things and that if gay sex is dis-criminalized there would be no reproduction. Obviously they don't anything about gays.
This is the situation in India. I am a girl from there and I've always felt that gays, bisexuals and transgender are completely natural. The world around me thought differently but I didn’t care. I couldn’t actually pin-point my sexual orientation when I was 12 or 13. It was really confusing then; sometimes I was not at all aroused by both sexes, which led me to wonder whether I was asexual. But when I was 14 I had two brief relationships, one with a boy and one with a girl (this happens a lot here, without the parents ever knowing). This made me see that it felt right with both of them, I did a lot of trials with myself just to make sure and after a few months I was sure. I am bi and could not be more proud of it. But I knew keeping this to myself would be the safe thing to do, but I felt I had to do something. Not telling anyone would not be hiding in the closet here, as I’ve said even relationships between girls and boys are looked down upon.
I finally decided to tell my friends. I had three best friends and I told all three. Two of them were fine with it and they were in support of me but one. The one I had known for 6 years stopped talking to me and even threatened to complain against me. I tried my best to talk to her but she turned my back on me and hasn’t talked to me in a year. This was hard on me and I could never have been alright if it weren’t for my other two best friends. Now I am 16 and debating on how to tell my parents. So in a few months someone is going to drag me to psychologist to fix me. I wish my parents and the parents all around the world the best of luck because there is no way they are going to succeed.
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Bhagya Rajesh (user currently living in INDIA) posted for bisexual readers on 28/12/2013 tagged with sexual orientation +5
link
I come from India. To be precise from Kerala, in the extreme south. The community there is extremely literate and males and females enjoy equal status to some extent. Kerala is really different from the rest of India: developed but still holds on to old traditions. This has affected the life of all the people. Here parents choose your spouse. Sure you will have some say in it but essentially you meet a guy or girl via a broker or internet marriage sites(we have a lot of them in India), you talk to them maybe five or six times and a few months later you're married to them. The criteria for marriage here is education, wealth and beauty. If you have all three you are hot in the marriage market. Yes, here marriage is like a transaction, spoiled by the dowry system which still persists. The girl ends up in a house and has to live with her in-laws probably until her husband saves enough money to have a house of their own, which will probably take ten years.
Parents here say that if the children love them they will only marry the people their parents want them to marry. So if you are a straight guy or girl and falls in love with someone, you have to have some real courage because when your parents find out that you're in a relationship they will probably lock you up.
In a place like this being gay, bi or transgender is pretty hard. As if to add oil to the fire, the supreme court of India has recently withdrawn an order by a high court to dis-criminalize gay sex. They still categorize gay sex with that of sex with animals.
The religious leaders are saying that gays disturb the natural order of things and that if gay sex is dis-criminalized there would be no reproduction. Obviously they don't anything about gays.
This is the situation in India. I am a girl from there and I've always felt that gays, bisexuals and transgender are completely natural. The world around me thought differently but I didn’t care. I couldn’t actually pin-point my sexual orientation when I was 12 or 13. It was really confusing then; sometimes I was not at all aroused by both sexes, which led me to wonder whether I was asexual. But when I was 14 I had two brief relationships, one with a boy and one with a girl (this happens a lot here, without the parents ever knowing). This made me see that it felt right with both of them, I did a lot of trials with myself just to make sure and after a few months I was sure. I am bi and could not be more proud of it. But I knew keeping this to myself would be the safe thing to do, but I felt I had to do something. Not telling anyone would not be hiding in the closet here, as I’ve said even relationships between girls and boys are looked down upon.
I finally decided to tell my friends. I had three best friends and I told all three. Two of them were fine with it and they were in support of me but one. The one I had known for 6 years stopped talking to me and even threatened to complain against me. I tried my best to talk to her but she turned my back on me and hasn’t talked to me in a year. This was hard on me and I could never have been alright if it weren’t for my other two best friends. Now I am 16 and debating on how to tell my parents. So in a few months someone is going to drag me to psychologist to fix me. I wish my parents and the parents all around the world the best of luck because there is no way they are going to succeed.
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add response to story
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