Home, Asia, Europe, North America, Latin America and Caribbean, Oceania, News, Sitemap
Home / Asia / Hong Kong / Your Stories
loading map..

HONG KONG

Is it possible to change your gender on official documents?: Yes, but only with sex reassignment surgery

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Have people in HONG KONG assumed your HIV/AIDS status because of your sexual orientation?
Yes, people think I have AIDS because I am gay (0 %) Yes, the government thinks sexual orientation and HIV or AIDS status is the same (0 %) Yes (0 %) No (0 %)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
Post a new story to this section

Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in HONG KONG...
Mimi Wong (user currently living in HONG KONG) posted for transgender readers on 06/03/2014 tagged with human rights
link
Transgender woman refused prostate cancer test at clinic in Central
PUBLISHED : Sunday, 26 January, 2014, 5:33am
UPDATED : Sunday, 26 January, 2014, 5:33am
Lana Lam lana.lam@scmp.com


York Chow Yat-ngok, chairman of the Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC)
A transgender woman wants a formal apology from a Central clinic after she was initially refused a prostate cancer screening test because a doctor said a pap smear was her only option, given that her identity card stated she was a woman.

The 59-year-old woman, who underwent sex reassignment surgery in 2010, said the clinic should have been more flexible about her medical needs when she booked the test in November. "I was so angry that I wrote to the Equal Opportunities Commission [EOC] on that same day," Michelle (not her real name) said.

A spokeswoman for the clinic, Dr Vio & Partners, said the general manager was not available for comment yesterday. She said the clinic had verbally apologised to Michelle on November 24 and a prostate cancer test was carried out on December 24.

However, Michelle is seeking a formal apology: "The clinic doesn't think it's necessary, but it's a matter of principle".

The clinic spokeswoman confirmed that the clinic was in discussions with the EOC on how to resolve the matter.

"We regret what happened, but we didn't apologise. The EOC didn't say we had to use the word 'apologise'," she said. "We had no intention to discriminate and it was the doctor's inflexibility as she did not seek advice from higher management."

On the EOC's support of Michelle's complaint of unfair treatment under the Disability Discrimination Ordinance, the clinic spokeswoman said "our higher management disagree" with the finding that being transgender was a disability.

"We are open to discussion, but if someone wants to victimise herself, I don't know," she said.

The EOC defines gender identity disorder as a psychiatric disability which falls under the Disability Discrimination Ordinance.

Michelle's complaint is one of two being handled by the Hong Kong branch of the Association of World Citizens, an NGO with consultative status with the UN's Economic and Social Council.
add response to story
Mimi Wong (user currently living in HONG KONG) posted for transgender readers on 06/03/2014 tagged with human rights
link
Transgender woman refused prostate cancer test at clinic in Central
PUBLISHED : Sunday, 26 January, 2014, 5:33am
UPDATED : Sunday, 26 January, 2014, 5:33am
Lana Lam lana.lam@scmp.com


York Chow Yat-ngok, chairman of the Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC)
A transgender woman wants a formal apology from a Central clinic after she was initially refused a prostate cancer screening test because a doctor said a pap smear was her only option, given that her identity card stated she was a woman.

The 59-year-old woman, who underwent sex reassignment surgery in 2010, said the clinic should have been more flexible about her medical needs when she booked the test in November. "I was so angry that I wrote to the Equal Opportunities Commission [EOC] on that same day," Michelle (not her real name) said.

A spokeswoman for the clinic, Dr Vio & Partners, said the general manager was not available for comment yesterday. She said the clinic had verbally apologised to Michelle on November 24 and a prostate cancer test was carried out on December 24.

However, Michelle is seeking a formal apology: "The clinic doesn't think it's necessary, but it's a matter of principle".

The clinic spokeswoman confirmed that the clinic was in discussions with the EOC on how to resolve the matter.

"We regret what happened, but we didn't apologise. The EOC didn't say we had to use the word 'apologise'," she said. "We had no intention to discriminate and it was the doctor's inflexibility as she did not seek advice from higher management."

On the EOC's support of Michelle's complaint of unfair treatment under the Disability Discrimination Ordinance, the clinic spokeswoman said "our higher management disagree" with the finding that being transgender was a disability.

"We are open to discussion, but if someone wants to victimise herself, I don't know," she said.

The EOC defines gender identity disorder as a psychiatric disability which falls under the Disability Discrimination Ordinance.

Michelle's complaint is one of two being handled by the Hong Kong branch of the Association of World Citizens, an NGO with consultative status with the UN's Economic and Social Council.
add response to story
add response to story
Bookmark and Share