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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in GEORGIA...
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Nino Kharchilava (user currently living in GEORGIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 27/12/2012 tagged with human rights
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CM/REC(2010)5 – monitoring of implementation (Georgia)


On 31 March 2010 the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe adopted its Recommendation to member states “on measures to combat discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation or gender identity” – CM/REC(2010)5. The Recommendation is the world’s first international legal instrument dealing specifically with discrimination on these grounds.

In broad terms the Recommendation does three things:

a) It emphasizes the key principle, that human rights are universal and apply to all individuals, including therefore LGBT persons;

b) It acknowledges the fact of the centuries-old and continuing discrimination experienced by LGBT persons on ac­count of their sexual orientation or gender identity;

c) It recognizes that specific action is required to ensure the full enjoyment of human rights by LGBT persons, and sets out the measures required of member state governments.

The Recommendation was agreed unanimously by the 47 Council of Europe member states. Although, as a Recommendation rather than a Convention, it is not legally binding, it is based solidly on the existing legally binding international and European human rights obligations of the member states, which therefore have a clear duty to implement its main elements.

The purpose of this report was to assess what progress has been made by Georgian authorities in implementing the Recommendation, and to highlight the areas were further action is needed. By documenting which measures have, and which have not been completed, it provides a base line against which to measure further progress in implementing the Recommendation in the coming years.

The report has two main target audiences. First, at national level, the political leaders and civil servants who are responsible for implementing the recommendation. And secondly, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, which agreed, on adopting the Recommendation, that it would conduct a review of progress towards its implementation in March 2013. It is intended that this report will contribute to that review.

English version of the report can be found at the following link:http://women.ge/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/CM_REC20105GEORGIA_ENG_www.pdf
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WISG's CEDAW shadow report: LBT women in Georgia (user currently living in GEORGIA) posted for lesbian transgender bisexual readers on 25/04/2012 tagged with gender identity, human rights, sexual orientation +0
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Women’s Initiatives Supporting Group (WISG) published CEDAW shadow report: LBT Women in Georgia.

Violence against women is closely linked to socially constructed views on masculinity and famininity. Patriarcal opinions on gender and gender norms put a strong distinction between the two and facilitate unequal distribution of power based sex/gender-related considerations.

In a society where gender asymmetry is sharp, even a slight deviation from established gender norms can turn into a reason for violence and discrimination. In such societies LBT (Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender) women usually constitute one of the most vulnerable groups; They are discriminated based on both - thier sex and their sexual orientation/ gender identity.

Despite some recent LGBT- related groundbreaking developments in the field of human rights, in Georgia LGBT still remains one of the most “invisible” groups. As a result, violence against LGBT people also remains “invisible” and goes unreported to human rights organizations, state institutions, as well as the wider public.

In Georgia LBT rights are not seen as a part of women’s rights in general; LBT issues are practically eliminated from the agenda of women’s rights organizations. This, in addition to the high level of homophobia, makes it particularly difficult to identify individual instances of discrimination and to measure the overall scope of the problem. For this reason we consider that fact that discussion and monitoring of LBT rights in Georgia starts in the context of women’s rights in general is very important.
The structure of the report is based on the methodology which has been devised by IGLHRC (International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commision). Each chapter starts with a provision from the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women or a CEDAW recommendation and a relevant provision from the Yogyakarta Principles.

The publication is available on WISG’s website; the file can be downloaded here:

http://women.ge/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/WISG-LBT-CEDAW-shadow-report_eng.pdf

About WISG
Women’s Initiatives Supporting Group (WISG) is a non-governmental, non-profit-making organization working on women’s rights in Georgia. It was founded in 2000 and started to work on the issue of homophobia in 2002. Since 2003 WISG has been working on research and analysis of homophobic hate speech in Georgian media. From 2005 its women’s rights program has been focusing on LBT women’s empowerment in Georgia. Since 2010 the overall goal of WISG’s women rights programme is to support LBT women in having absolute right and a full accessibility to participate in all the areas of life through empowerment of the group, advocacy and increasing the level of tolerance towards LBT group in the society.

WISG is a member of international networks: AWID, ILGA-EUROPE and IGLYO.
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eariare 1,745 (user currently living in GEORGIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex readers on 15/03/2012 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, laws and leadership
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On March 12th, 2012 Georgian gender equality and LGBT human rights organization Identoba addressed the authors of the 53rd paragraph of the Georgian criminal law – members of georgian parliament, Zviad Kukava and Kakha Anjaparidze, with a special statement, inviting them to include gender identity and sexual orientation in the list of the aggravating circumstances of discrimination, which already includes discrimination on racial, language, religious, national and ethnic grounds.

Today the Legal Issues Committee of Georgian Parliament held the second hearing of the bill, where Levan Kokaia, lawyer representing Identoba and parliamentary secretary for the Young Georgian Lawyer’s Association, Tatuli Todua, called for members of parliament to consider the abovementioned recommendation.

The Legal Issues Committee of Georgian Parliament has agreed to apply the recommendation to the bill and sexual orientation and gender identity were included in the list of the grounds for discrimination, which will be considered as the aggravating circumstances in the new criminal law.

Our organization remains hopeful that “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” will stay in the final version of the law, which will be approved by the Georgian Parliament after the third hearing scheduled next week.

http://identoba.org/5834
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(user currently living in GEORGIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex readers on 15/03/2012 tagged with hate crime and violence prevention, human rights, laws and leadership
link
On March 12th, 2012 Georgian gender equality and LGBT human rights organization Identoba addressed the authors of the 53rd paragraph of the Georgian criminal law – members of georgian parliament, Zviad Kukava and Kakha Anjaparidze, with a special statement, inviting them to include gender identity and sexual orientation in the list of the aggravating circumstances of discrimination, which already includes discrimination on racial, language, religious, national and ethnic grounds.

Today the Legal Issues Committee of Georgian Parliament held the second hearing of the bill, where Levan Kokaia, lawyer representing Identoba and parliamentary secretary for the Young Georgian Lawyer’s Association, Tatuli Todua, called for members of parliament to consider the abovementioned recommendation.

The Legal Issues Committee of Georgian Parliament has agreed to apply the recommendation to the bill and sexual orientation and gender identity were included in the list of the grounds for discrimination, which will be considered as the aggravating circumstances in the new criminal law.

Our organization remains hopeful that “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” will stay in the final version of the law, which will be approved by the Georgian Parliament after the third hearing scheduled next week.

http://identoba.org/5834
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