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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in ETHIOPIA...
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A short documentary about gay Ugandan refugees in The Netherlands, who fled their home country due to anti gay laws in Uganda. I hereby send you the link of the video on Vimeo.

http://vimeo.com/98122540
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Rainbow Ethiopia LGBTI Human Rights, Outreach HIV/AIDS and Psycho-social Support Services (user currently living in ETHIOPIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 28/04/2013 tagged with intersex, hate crime and violence prevention, health, hiv/aids , gender identity, human rights, laws and leadership , sexual orientation, religion, illegality of female to female relationships, illegality of male to male relationships +9
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Ethiopian LGBTs need help to halt abuses

Posted on April 27, 2013 by Rainbow Ethiopia

Ethiopia has one of the world’s most restrictive laws governing attempts to protect the rights and health of women, children, LGBT people, the sick and the disabled.

As a result, those people’s rights and health are endangered, and too little is being done to change that.

A law called the Charities and Societies Proclamation (CSP) 621/2009 bans any advocacy and human rights work seeking to end violence against women and children or to promote the rights of people with disabilities, people living with HIV, or other marginalized populations.

Further, grassroots organizations and front-line activists working for the rights and sexual health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in Ethiopia are in danger both because of CSP 621/2009 and because of anti-homosexuality Proclamation No. 414/2004.2012, which provides for prison sentences of up to 15 years for consensual same-sex sexual activity.

As a result, little progress has been made in suppressing violence against LGBT individuals, which is inflicted both by police and by mobs. LGBT people tend to keep their sexual orientation a secret to avoid arrest and social stigma. LGBT activists fear for their safety, because a number of them have been detained, interrogated and tortured.

The U.S. and other countries don’t do enough to push for an end to such violations. Although they know that change is needed, they don’t make it a priority. Every year the U.S. State Department copies and pastes the same two paragraphs in its Ethiopian Human Rights Report under the heading “Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity.” This is the wording from the newly released 2012 report:

Consensual same-sex sexual activity is illegal and punishable by imprisonment under the law. There were some reports of violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals; reporting was limited due to fear of retribution, discrimination, or stigmatization. Persons did not identify themselves as LGBT persons due to severe societal stigma and the illegality of consensual same-sex sexual activity. Activists in the LGBT community stated they were followed and at times feared for their safety. There were periodic detainments of some in the LGBT community, combined with interrogation and alleged physical abuse.

The AIDS Resource Center in Addis Ababa reported the majority of self-identified gay and lesbian callers, the majority of whom were male, requested assistance in changing their behavior to avoid discrimination. Many gay men reported anxiety, confusion, identity crises, depression, self-ostracism, religious conflict, and suicide attempts.


Ethiopia’s location in East Africa

A first step toward would be for the U.S. embassy and U.S. human rights missions in the country to work closely with local LGBT activists and community leaders to flesh out the 2013 report. It’s important to record the specifics about the degrading and so-far-unreported human rights violations that Ethiopian people experience on the basis of their sexual identity and gender orientation.

A similar shortcoming applies to the U.K.’s 2012 Human Rights and Democracy Report, which mentions nothing about the human rights abuses targeted at LGBT people in Ethiopia.

Along the same lines, a conference of African Union health ministers is being held this week in Addis Ababa to discuss ways to combat the continent’s diseases. The pressing issue of LGBT people and HIV in Africa is not in their agenda.

It’s not because the foreign governments don’t know what’s going on. HIV activists and LGBT human right workers continually report incidents of social justice and human rights abuses to the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor and to the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The hope is that international organizations such as those will investigate and work with the Ethiopian government to address the issue.

For more information visit our website:

http://www.rainbow-ethiopia.org/
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Rainbow Ethiopia LGBTI Human Rights, Outreach HIV/AIDS and Psycho-social Support Services (user currently living in ETHIOPIA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 28/04/2013 tagged with intersex, hate crime and violence prevention, health, hiv/aids , gender identity, human rights, laws and leadership , sexual orientation, religion, illegality of female to female relationships, illegality of male to male relationships +0
link
Ethiopian LGBTs need help to halt abuses

Posted on April 27, 2013 by Rainbow Ethiopia

Ethiopia has one of the world’s most restrictive laws governing attempts to protect the rights and health of women, children, LGBT people, the sick and the disabled.

As a result, those people’s rights and health are endangered, and too little is being done to change that.

A law called the Charities and Societies Proclamation (CSP) 621/2009 bans any advocacy and human rights work seeking to end violence against women and children or to promote the rights of people with disabilities, people living with HIV, or other marginalized populations.

Further, grassroots organizations and front-line activists working for the rights and sexual health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in Ethiopia are in danger both because of CSP 621/2009 and because of anti-homosexuality Proclamation No. 414/2004.2012, which provides for prison sentences of up to 15 years for consensual same-sex sexual activity.

As a result, little progress has been made in suppressing violence against LGBT individuals, which is inflicted both by police and by mobs. LGBT people tend to keep their sexual orientation a secret to avoid arrest and social stigma. LGBT activists fear for their safety, because a number of them have been detained, interrogated and tortured.

The U.S. and other countries don’t do enough to push for an end to such violations. Although they know that change is needed, they don’t make it a priority. Every year the U.S. State Department copies and pastes the same two paragraphs in its Ethiopian Human Rights Report under the heading “Societal Abuses, Discrimination, and Acts of Violence Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity.” This is the wording from the newly released 2012 report:

Consensual same-sex sexual activity is illegal and punishable by imprisonment under the law. There were some reports of violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals; reporting was limited due to fear of retribution, discrimination, or stigmatization. Persons did not identify themselves as LGBT persons due to severe societal stigma and the illegality of consensual same-sex sexual activity. Activists in the LGBT community stated they were followed and at times feared for their safety. There were periodic detainments of some in the LGBT community, combined with interrogation and alleged physical abuse.

The AIDS Resource Center in Addis Ababa reported the majority of self-identified gay and lesbian callers, the majority of whom were male, requested assistance in changing their behavior to avoid discrimination. Many gay men reported anxiety, confusion, identity crises, depression, self-ostracism, religious conflict, and suicide attempts.


Ethiopia’s location in East Africa

A first step toward would be for the U.S. embassy and U.S. human rights missions in the country to work closely with local LGBT activists and community leaders to flesh out the 2013 report. It’s important to record the specifics about the degrading and so-far-unreported human rights violations that Ethiopian people experience on the basis of their sexual identity and gender orientation.

A similar shortcoming applies to the U.K.’s 2012 Human Rights and Democracy Report, which mentions nothing about the human rights abuses targeted at LGBT people in Ethiopia.

Along the same lines, a conference of African Union health ministers is being held this week in Addis Ababa to discuss ways to combat the continent’s diseases. The pressing issue of LGBT people and HIV in Africa is not in their agenda.

It’s not because the foreign governments don’t know what’s going on. HIV activists and LGBT human right workers continually report incidents of social justice and human rights abuses to the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor and to the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The hope is that international organizations such as those will investigate and work with the Ethiopian government to address the issue.

For more information visit our website:

http://www.rainbow-ethiopia.org/
add response to story
LaG (user currently living in ETHIOPIA) posted for gay readers on 11/05/2012 tagged with health, hiv/aids , sexual orientation, religion, illegality of male to male relationships +15
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Ethiopia is one of the 38 African countries where Homosexuality is illegal. According to the 2007 Global attitude research done by Pew Research Center Project, 97percent of Ethiopians strongly consider Homosexuality as a serious of violation of morality. According to article 629 of the criminal code

"whoever perform with another person of the same sex a homosexuality act or any other indecent act, is punishable with simple imprisonment".

According to this article homosexuality is punishable even it is done by two parties with consent or agreement.The penalties for being engaged in homosexual act ranges from 3 years up to 15 years imprisonment.







Beside our criminal law that bans us, we always face stigma and discrimination from the society and often discouraged and being marginalized from getting different services. As a result we are vulnerable than other part of society because of discouragement we face from health workers and society to get health services and existence of conservative social values.





In Ethiopia the fundamental human rights that are inherent, universal and acquired by virtue of humanity are being violated because of our sexual orientation that was personal. Right to access health services, right to speech, work, association and basic human rights are still denied.





Their is no single organization that is engaged to provide human right and HIV prevention information to us. Different governmental and non governmental organizations are trying to create awareness on HIV and STI but none of them are working to the very at risk and vulnerable community of LGTB. They are extremely or totally ignoring us from any health services.





Why we hide it?



Stigma : Social stigma and discrimination driven homosexuality in to virtue of hiding. For fear of social discrimination and arrest, members avoid who they are. They hide their sexual orientation even to their parents in fear of exclusions from their family and neighborhood. Most of the time, older gays have large families, to be perceived as a straight in the view of the rest society.



Homosexuality is a taboo and most of the citizens perceived it as un existed. Coming out and expressing our selves as LGTB has its own social consequences, from a little threat and discrimination to death.





On January 27/2009, there was a call from religious leaders, including Ethiopian Orthodox Church, Catholic Church, Protestants and Islam, to force the government to adopt a more strong law against LGTB’s. They are seeking to ban and end homosexuality, which they think “an evil of westerns” and “immoral/ abnormal act”, by amending harsh rule.





On the meeting Abuna Paulos-The head for Orthodox Church of Ethiopia as well as the world-said"This is something very strange in Ethiopia, the Bible condemns this very strongly. For people to act in this manner they have to be dumb, stupid like animals," he continued "We strongly condemn this behavior. They have to be disciplined and their acts must be discriminated, they have to be given a lesson."





There was a high public violence against the 16th ICASA conference held in Ethiopia. AMSHeR meetings were disrupted when a group of religious leaders called for a press conference to denounce the purported ‘gay meetings’ that was planned at Jupiter hotel. The AMSHeR meeting is altered from Jupiter hotel to the UN conference hall as a result of the public violence happened in Addis Ababa.





Fear of LAW: - as stated earlier the criminal law of Ethiopia bans homosexuality. The criminalization of homosexuality by the law of the land prohibits the community from getting different health services which increases their vulnerability to HIV/AIDS and other STI. Peoples are leading bleak indeed life.
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