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CANADA

Male to Male relationships: Legal
Punishments for male to male relationships: No law
Female to Female Relationships: Legal
Age of consent: Different for heterosexuals and homosexuals
Marriage and Substitutes for Marriage: Recognized on national level
Is it possible to change your gender on official documents?: Only in some areas
Gay or lesbian able to serve in the armed forces: Yes

Your Views

Are you LGBTI? We want to hear from you! Help us inform other users of the site with your views on this country. Below is a random question about this country. If it is relevant to you please answer it.

Have you been harassed or arrested in CANADA because of your same-sex relationship?

The majority of people visiting this site have said No

Yes, it is against the law to be gay, lesbian or trans (0 %) Yes, but it is not against the law (10%) Yes (0 %) No (90%)

The Your Stories section is all about you! Please take a minute to tell visitors of the ILGA website about what LGBTI life is like in reality. Please submit your personal story and share your experience!

YOUR STORIES
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Readers Experiences

This is what people are saying about life for LGBTI people in CANADA...
Val (user currently living in CANADA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 20/04/2010 tagged with lgbt families, laws and leadership , marriage / civil unions
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I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. LGBT activism is alive and well here. Queer folks in Nova Scotia have been very brave over the past 20 years or so with coming out and insisiting upon change. Nova Scotia was one of the first provinces in Canada to have the Domestic Partner Registry System which gay or straight couples could use to register their common law relationships and be afforded some of the benefits of a legally recognized couple. A few years later, all Canadians were given the full and legal right to marry.
I have lived in Ontario and Newfoundland as well. I came out at 28 with two small children. There were challenges along the way of educating teachers, doctors, etc. My children found it quite amusing at times and frustrating at other times. They often wished for a gay friendly community, especially in the suburbs. They could see it in big city downtown areas but not in suburbia in the 80's. I have never hidden the fact that I am a lesbian (once I realized it myself) and have had almost all positive experiences. No one has ever had the courage to say anything negative to me. I am a strong woman. Many people have said thanks for opening their eyes on GLBT issues. My children are grown now and my daughter is lesbian as well. It is our normal and we love our country. Over the last couple of years, I have met lesbian couples who have moved from other countries in the world because of our right to marry and for other great reasons to live in Canada.
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Val (user currently living in CANADA) posted for gay lesbian transgender bisexual intersex straight readers on 20/04/2010 tagged with lgbt families, laws and leadership , marriage / civil unions
link
I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. LGBT activism is alive and well here. Queer folks in Nova Scotia have been very brave over the past 20 years or so with coming out and insisiting upon change. Nova Scotia was one of the first provinces in Canada to have the Domestic Partner Registry System which gay or straight couples could use to register their common law relationships and be afforded some of the benefits of a legally recognized couple. A few years later, all Canadians were given the full and legal right to marry.
I have lived in Ontario and Newfoundland as well. I came out at 28 with two small children. There were challenges along the way of educating teachers, doctors, etc. My children found it quite amusing at times and frustrating at other times. They often wished for a gay friendly community, especially in the suburbs. They could see it in big city downtown areas but not in suburbia in the 80's. I have never hidden the fact that I am a lesbian (once I realized it myself) and have had almost all positive experiences. No one has ever had the courage to say anything negative to me. I am a strong woman. Many people have said thanks for opening their eyes on GLBT issues. My children are grown now and my daughter is lesbian as well. It is our normal and we love our country. Over the last couple of years, I have met lesbian couples who have moved from other countries in the world because of our right to marry and for other great reasons to live in Canada.
add response to story
add response to story
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